Paul Ben-Victor
       
     
  And though he’s had the chance to play a great number of heavies and very bad men in his star-studded career, we’re happy to say you’d never know it to meet the man, who was all warmth and gracious conversation when we sat down with him to chat about his tastes in architecture and his beautiful home (where he lives with his wife, Julie Ben-Victor) : a clean, modern, space filled with gorgeous works of art - and in many ways, the polar opposite of what you might expect from a man who’s played such a collection of bad apples and malcontents as he’s so often been called on to portray.
       
     
  His instinct to constantly transform and reinvent played a significant role in the purchase of his luminous Santa Monica condo. “I was living in Encino, in a huge Spanish hacienda, but all my friends and stomping grounds where in Santa Monica. I would find myself staying in hotels or sleeping at friends’ houses so I could be in this city. That’s when I made the decision to purchase something on this side of town,” Victor states while flashing his trademark grin. “I decided on the neighborhood and then the street. I knew exactly what neighborhood and street I wanted to live on, and I literally told myself that this was the street and here I am.”
       
     
  “Every home should have a good bottle of Cabernet with some nice Riedel glasses, a comfortable sofa, and some good ol’ classic rock and roll.”
       
     
  Although the move seemed flawless, as easy as packing up the U-Haul, Ben-Victor spent years transforming the condo to fit his personal aesthetic. “I basically gutted the entire place. It was a real fixer when I got it nine years ago.  Everything has been completely remodeled including new electrical, plumbing, walls, bathrooms, doors and windows.  It took three years to finally settle on and get the design approved to remove some walls in the main room and then eight 25-foot steel beams were installed to bear the weight of the load. That was the biggest hurdle, but it became exactly what I had envisioned.” That is exactly what Ben-Victor does best, making dreams a reality.
       
     
  As a student at Carnegie Mellon University, he was majoring in set design when a fellow student pulled him off light plots to be the “Puerto Rican” in the play  Short Eyes . “I’m not even Puerto Rican! I was pretty good at set design, but acting…acting I was better.”    His early technique in set design has been the backbone for his interior design, whether it’s installing the Lutron RadioRA lighting system, positioning his eclectic mixture of international pottery, or perfectly showcasing his father’s (renowned photographer Victor Friedman) hauntingly beautiful artwork, Victor has a keen eye for interior placement.
       
     
  Indeed, his interior is abound with top-of-the-line upgrades including a Viking stove and range, custom-designed patio windows and a one-of-a-kind closet that would make any grown woman weep. Yet, these are not the items Victor holds dear.    “Today my home continues to be filled mostly with my folks’ art. My mom’s a painter, and I have some of her work as well as my dad’s, who I’m proud to say has a book of his new work called   Flag   out this winter.   My wife has done some beautiful drawings, and we have some of my sister’s textile art.  These are the things that you can’t replace, and I wouldn’t want to part with.”
       
     
  Although the move seemed flawless, as easy as packing up the U-Haul, Ben-Victor spent years transforming the condo to fit his personal aesthetic. “I basically gutted the entire place. It was a real fixer when I got it nine years ago.  Everything has been completely remodeled including new electrical, plumbing, walls, bathrooms, doors and windows.  It took three years to finally settle on and get the design approved to remove some walls in the main room and then eight 25-foot steel beams were installed to bear the weight of the load. That was the biggest hurdle, but it became exactly what I had envisioned.” That is exactly what Ben-Victor does best, making dreams a reality.
       
     
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Paul Ben-Victor
       
     
Paul Ben-Victor

A Modern Visionary

We’ve been seeing a lot of Paul Ben-Victor - and we’re willing to bet you have, too, even if you may not realize it.  Over the last two decades, he’s steadily built a reputation as one of film and television’s most recognizable journeyman character actors, from early work on Cagney & Lacey and Doogie Howser, MD, to major recurring roles as Greek mobster Spiros ‘Vondas’ Vondopoulos on David Simon’s critically-acclaimed HBO drama The Wire and his most recent spot as top witness protection Inspector Stan McQueen on the current USA Networks hit In Plain Sight.  He’s a man who most all of us have seen at one time or another, and he’s worked with many of Hollywood’s greatest, from Clint Eastwood to Quentin Tarantino - and yet he’s one of our best known unknown actors, hiding in plain sight on the airwaves and the silver screen.

  And though he’s had the chance to play a great number of heavies and very bad men in his star-studded career, we’re happy to say you’d never know it to meet the man, who was all warmth and gracious conversation when we sat down with him to chat about his tastes in architecture and his beautiful home (where he lives with his wife, Julie Ben-Victor) : a clean, modern, space filled with gorgeous works of art - and in many ways, the polar opposite of what you might expect from a man who’s played such a collection of bad apples and malcontents as he’s so often been called on to portray.
       
     

And though he’s had the chance to play a great number of heavies and very bad men in his star-studded career, we’re happy to say you’d never know it to meet the man, who was all warmth and gracious conversation when we sat down with him to chat about his tastes in architecture and his beautiful home (where he lives with his wife, Julie Ben-Victor) : a clean, modern, space filled with gorgeous works of art - and in many ways, the polar opposite of what you might expect from a man who’s played such a collection of bad apples and malcontents as he’s so often been called on to portray.

  His instinct to constantly transform and reinvent played a significant role in the purchase of his luminous Santa Monica condo. “I was living in Encino, in a huge Spanish hacienda, but all my friends and stomping grounds where in Santa Monica. I would find myself staying in hotels or sleeping at friends’ houses so I could be in this city. That’s when I made the decision to purchase something on this side of town,” Victor states while flashing his trademark grin. “I decided on the neighborhood and then the street. I knew exactly what neighborhood and street I wanted to live on, and I literally told myself that this was the street and here I am.”
       
     

His instinct to constantly transform and reinvent played a significant role in the purchase of his luminous Santa Monica condo. “I was living in Encino, in a huge Spanish hacienda, but all my friends and stomping grounds where in Santa Monica. I would find myself staying in hotels or sleeping at friends’ houses so I could be in this city. That’s when I made the decision to purchase something on this side of town,” Victor states while flashing his trademark grin. “I decided on the neighborhood and then the street. I knew exactly what neighborhood and street I wanted to live on, and I literally told myself that this was the street and here I am.”

  “Every home should have a good bottle of Cabernet with some nice Riedel glasses, a comfortable sofa, and some good ol’ classic rock and roll.”
       
     

“Every home should have a good bottle of Cabernet with some nice Riedel glasses, a comfortable sofa, and some good ol’ classic rock and roll.”

  Although the move seemed flawless, as easy as packing up the U-Haul, Ben-Victor spent years transforming the condo to fit his personal aesthetic. “I basically gutted the entire place. It was a real fixer when I got it nine years ago.  Everything has been completely remodeled including new electrical, plumbing, walls, bathrooms, doors and windows.  It took three years to finally settle on and get the design approved to remove some walls in the main room and then eight 25-foot steel beams were installed to bear the weight of the load. That was the biggest hurdle, but it became exactly what I had envisioned.” That is exactly what Ben-Victor does best, making dreams a reality.
       
     

Although the move seemed flawless, as easy as packing up the U-Haul, Ben-Victor spent years transforming the condo to fit his personal aesthetic. “I basically gutted the entire place. It was a real fixer when I got it nine years ago.  Everything has been completely remodeled including new electrical, plumbing, walls, bathrooms, doors and windows.  It took three years to finally settle on and get the design approved to remove some walls in the main room and then eight 25-foot steel beams were installed to bear the weight of the load. That was the biggest hurdle, but it became exactly what I had envisioned.” That is exactly what Ben-Victor does best, making dreams a reality.

  As a student at Carnegie Mellon University, he was majoring in set design when a fellow student pulled him off light plots to be the “Puerto Rican” in the play  Short Eyes . “I’m not even Puerto Rican! I was pretty good at set design, but acting…acting I was better.”    His early technique in set design has been the backbone for his interior design, whether it’s installing the Lutron RadioRA lighting system, positioning his eclectic mixture of international pottery, or perfectly showcasing his father’s (renowned photographer Victor Friedman) hauntingly beautiful artwork, Victor has a keen eye for interior placement.
       
     

As a student at Carnegie Mellon University, he was majoring in set design when a fellow student pulled him off light plots to be the “Puerto Rican” in the play Short Eyes. “I’m not even Puerto Rican! I was pretty good at set design, but acting…acting I was better.”

His early technique in set design has been the backbone for his interior design, whether it’s installing the Lutron RadioRA lighting system, positioning his eclectic mixture of international pottery, or perfectly showcasing his father’s (renowned photographer Victor Friedman) hauntingly beautiful artwork, Victor has a keen eye for interior placement.

  Indeed, his interior is abound with top-of-the-line upgrades including a Viking stove and range, custom-designed patio windows and a one-of-a-kind closet that would make any grown woman weep. Yet, these are not the items Victor holds dear.    “Today my home continues to be filled mostly with my folks’ art. My mom’s a painter, and I have some of her work as well as my dad’s, who I’m proud to say has a book of his new work called   Flag   out this winter.   My wife has done some beautiful drawings, and we have some of my sister’s textile art.  These are the things that you can’t replace, and I wouldn’t want to part with.”
       
     

Indeed, his interior is abound with top-of-the-line upgrades including a Viking stove and range, custom-designed patio windows and a one-of-a-kind closet that would make any grown woman weep. Yet, these are not the items Victor holds dear.

“Today my home continues to be filled mostly with my folks’ art. My mom’s a painter, and I have some of her work as well as my dad’s, who I’m proud to say has a book of his new work called Flag out this winter.   My wife has done some beautiful drawings, and we have some of my sister’s textile art.  These are the things that you can’t replace, and I wouldn’t want to part with.”

  Although the move seemed flawless, as easy as packing up the U-Haul, Ben-Victor spent years transforming the condo to fit his personal aesthetic. “I basically gutted the entire place. It was a real fixer when I got it nine years ago.  Everything has been completely remodeled including new electrical, plumbing, walls, bathrooms, doors and windows.  It took three years to finally settle on and get the design approved to remove some walls in the main room and then eight 25-foot steel beams were installed to bear the weight of the load. That was the biggest hurdle, but it became exactly what I had envisioned.” That is exactly what Ben-Victor does best, making dreams a reality.
       
     

Although the move seemed flawless, as easy as packing up the U-Haul, Ben-Victor spent years transforming the condo to fit his personal aesthetic. “I basically gutted the entire place. It was a real fixer when I got it nine years ago.  Everything has been completely remodeled including new electrical, plumbing, walls, bathrooms, doors and windows.  It took three years to finally settle on and get the design approved to remove some walls in the main room and then eight 25-foot steel beams were installed to bear the weight of the load. That was the biggest hurdle, but it became exactly what I had envisioned.” That is exactly what Ben-Victor does best, making dreams a reality.

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